USPS warns of scam using its name

The United States Postal Service is warning residents about fake emails using their name. The messages claim to be alerts about an undelivered package, but they really carry a virus.USPS logo
How the Scam Works:

You receive an email message that appears to be a shipping notification. It says that the postal service has been unable to deliver your package. To claim it, you just need to download the attached confirmation form and take it to your local post office.

But when you click on the file, you find that it isn’t a receipt after all. It’s really a virus! Typically, these viruses phish for personal and banking information on your machine.

Like all scams, this one has many variations. Victims have reported receiving phone calls also claiming to alert you to an undelivered package. Instead of a virus, scammers try to phish for personal and banking information. The scam isn’t even limited to the USPS; Canada Post was targeted by a similar scam.

Tips to Avoid Email Scams:

Spot common email scams by following these tips:
    • Don’t believe what you see. Scammers make emails seem to come from a reputable source. Just because it looks like an “@usps.com” address does not mean it’s safe.
    • Be wary of unexpected emails that contain links or attachments. As always, do not click on links or open the files in unfamiliar emails.
    • Beware of pop-ups. Some pop-ups are designed to look like they’ve originated from your computer. If you see a pop-up that looks like an anti-virus software but warns of a problem that needs to be fixed with an extreme level of urgency, it may be a scam.
    • Watch for poor grammar and spelling. Scam emails often are riddled with typos.
    • Immediate action is necessary. Scam emails try to get you to act before you think by creating a sense of urgency. Don’t fall for it.
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1 Comment

Filed under Scam alert

One response to “USPS warns of scam using its name

  1. Mark Burrows

    How could anyone fall for that? When expecting a package one is generally given a tracking number. If any such email was sent, I would first verify the situation on the proper tracking site, if there was a conflict of information, I would know immediately that the email was a fraud.
    I have received such fraudulent emails that were using the logos of Western Union, Federal Express, and UPS. 99% of the time I was not expecting any package.
    I strongly advise that you register online will all of the main delivery systems including postal so that you have instant, personal, and direct accounting of any activity that would concern you. If it’s not there, then it does not exist.

    Mark Burrows

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