It takes more than a U.S. Treasury check to excite Cascade resident

By Robb Hicken/ BBB’s chief storyteller

With tax returns being delivered regularly this time of year, checks in mailboxes is common.

“It just didn’t look right from the start,” says Anita Scott of Cascade.

The check, from the United State Treasury, was for $2,950 and was coming from Citi Financial, a financial express company, at 1500 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C.

“That’s right, the United State Treasury,” she reiterates. “And the authorized signature is illegible, and not the real Secretary of the Treasury.”

Secretary Jacob Lew

Jacob “Jack” Lew was confirmed on Feb. 27 as the 76th Secretary of the Treasury. Prior to that he served as White House Chief of Staff for President Obama. This signature was from Rose Wilson, not Timothy Geitner, who was secretary before Mr. Lew.

But, more than anything, it then goes into a “Consumer Promotion Draw” from seven well-known businesses, and the information asked her to call Mrs. Victoria Jacobs in London, went, too, far.

“All they wanted me to do was pay $1,920 in taxes to receive $50,000 that would be delivered by FedEx or Ups… that’s right ups,” she said.

The letter asked her to call a toll-free number at 866-206-9031 and give her 2986NC number and name her winning numbers 01-05-09-25-44. Then, she should deposit the United State Treasury check in her bank account and send the money by Western Union or Money Gram to Linda Robinson or Paul Harrison.

“Oh, … and keep the change,” she says.

According to Wikipedia, toll-free telephone numbers in the United Kingdom are generally known as “freephone” numbers (British Telecom numbers are officially Freefone) and begin with the prefixes 0800, 0808 or the Cable & Wireless Freecall prefix 0500. The most commonly used prefix is 0800.

BBB reminds residents: Do NOT deposit or cash these checks. They are forgeries and will be returned to your bank account for collection of funds, fines and penalties. This is part of a pay forward scam.

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